October 20-21, 2017

Tapestry Conference

Registration is Now Open

Topics

Attachment: Parenting with Your Brain in Mind
Curt Thompson, M.D.
How can we create relational environments in which secure attachments are the more likely outcomes for those for whom we care.
Attachment: Parenting with Your Brain in Mind
Curt Thompson, M.D.

How can we create relational environments in which secure attachments are the more likely outcomes for those for whom we care, especially as we engage children in adoptive/foster settings?  This workshop will explore these and other related questions as we seek to care for the orphan and love God with all our mind in the process.

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Curt Thompson, M.D.

Curt Thompson, M.D., is a psychiatrist in private practice in Falls Church, Virginia and founder of Being Known, which develops teaching programs, seminars and resource materials to help people explore the connection between interpersonal neurobiology and Christian spirituality which lead to genuine change and transformation. 

Dr. Thompson is the author of Anatomy of the Soul (Tyndale, June 2010) which demonstrates how insights from interpersonal neurobiology resonate with biblical truths about God and creation—validating the deep human need for meaningful relationships as a key to a life of hope and fulfillment. He has also produced a video series entitled Knowing and Being Known: The Transforming Power of Relationships which provides a detailed journey through Dr. Thompson’s discoveries on these themes.

Thompson graduated from Wright State University School of Medicine and completed his psychiatric residency at Temple University Hospital. He is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. His clinical focus has been the treatment of adults, adolescents, and families. He is actively engaged in learning and teaching as he supervises clinical employees and facilitates ongoing education groups for patients and colleagues. Throughout his career, his main focus of clinical and research interest has been the integration of psychiatry, its associated disciplines, and Christian spirituality. He is a frequent speaker on the topic at workshops, conferences, and retreats.

For the past several years that interest has taken a more specific turn as he has gained expertise in the emerging field of interpersonal neurobiology. Thompson believes that the findings of interpersonal neurobiology point to important tenets of Christian faith that enable us to reflect on, understand, and experience that same faith in fresh, trustworthy ways. Through Being Known, Dr. Thompson is now creating a platform for educating clinicians, individuals, and groups through the development of training materials, seminars, and other resources.

He and his wife, Phyllis, are the parents of two children and reside in Arlington, Virginia. He serves as an elder at Washington Community Fellowship in Washington, D.C. His duties there have included preaching, teaching, and participation in the fellowship’s healing prayer ministry. He and his wife (a licensed clinical social worker) frequently provide premarital counseling services for couples in their congregation.

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Dealing with Shame in Order to Forgive
Cindy Lee
What we see day in and day out is that shame is what is left over after we do the work to process our stories.
Dealing with Shame in Order to Forgive
Cindy Lee

What we see day in and day out is that shame is what is left over after we do the work to process our stories. After we deal with shame, we can finally move into forgiveness. When behavior improves and we need to come full circle to forgiveness.

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Cindy Lee

Cindy is the co-founder and Executive Director of HALO Project.   HALO (Healing, Attachment, Loving Outreach) Project is a 10-week intensive intervention program for foster and adoptive families in need. HALO collaborates with occupational therapists, mental health clinicians, psychologists, speech pathologists and medical professionals to meet the diverse needs of this population.  HALO Project is committed to gathering research data to contribute to the body of evidence that supports best practices on trauma informed care.

In an effort to better serve families struggling with attachment issues, Cindy completed the TCU Institute of Child Development’s professional training program of the Trust-Based Relational Intervention Model (TBRI ®) developed by Dr. Karyn Purvis and Dr. David Cross. Since her completion of the TBRI ® training, Cindy has conducted numerous trainings to clinicians as well as foster parent groups and has been invited to assist the Institute of Child Development as a mentor at their week long trainings.  In addition, Cindy created the HALO Project, which is based on TBRI®. More information about HALO Project can be found at www.haloprojectokc.org.

In collaboration with Dr. Karyn Purvis and Dr. David Cross, Cindy has published a series of children books based upon the valuable lessons on TBRI ®, including Baby Owl Lost Her Whoo and It’s Tough to Be Gentle: A Dragon’s Tale, The Redo Roo, The Penguin and the Fine Looking Fish, and Doggie Doesn’t Know No. These books are sold on Amazon.com and the proceeds are donated to HALO Project and the Institute of Child Development.

In addition to being trained in TBRI®, Cindy has received specialty training in the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI), Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TFCBT), Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR), Seeking Safety, Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Model (TREM), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Theraplay® (including the Marschak Interaction Method (MIM), and Circle of Security™.   Cindy has experience treating a wide variety of issues including child abuse and neglect, trauma, anxiety, eating disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Dissociative Identity Disorder, Reactive Attachment Disorder and Addiction.

Cindy graduated with honors from Arizona State University with her Master’s in Social Work in 1999. Cindy is licensed by the Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers as well as the Oklahoma Board of Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors.

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Understanding our Kid's Sensory Needs
Kristin Mathis
Join us for an exploration of Sensory Issues and Self-Regulation.
Understanding our Kid's Sensory Needs
Kristin Mathis

Join us for an exploration of Sensory Issues and Self-Regulation. You may not realize it but these two systems play an enormous role in people’s behavior, especially for “kids from hard places.”  Whether you’re new to these ideas or a veteran, we think you’ll walk away with some new tools and fresh ideas.

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Kristin Mathis

Occupational Therapist

Kristin Mathis, OTR, and her husband Chris are parents to five amazing kiddos ages 4 -16 (domestic adoption, international toddler adoption, and foster care adoption). Kristin’s background is in child development with a masters degree in occupational therapy. She has worked for ECI and is currently doing home health. Kristin completed professional training in TBRI (Practicioner and Educator) at TCU and her passion for foster and adopted children leads her to find practical ways to encourage health and healing for these wonderful families. She loves brain research, iced tea, and Mexican food.  Her days are full of re-dos (mainly for her), problem-solving and laundry (NOT in that order)

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Understanding and Embracing the Inherent Loss and Grief in Adoption (Part I)
Tara Vanderwoude
While adoption is widely celebrated and brings joy to so many, it is also a response to an initial tragedy and subsequent loss.
Understanding and Embracing the Inherent Loss and Grief in Adoption (Part I)
Tara Vanderwoude

While adoption is widely celebrated and brings joy to so many, it is also a response to an initial tragedy and subsequent loss. Learn how an adopted child is often faced with making sense of this loss. Hear how parents can acknowledge, understand, and give words to the losses – allowing their children to make sense of their full histories, express grief, and feel understood and supported.  As an adopted person and adoptive parent, Tara VanderWoude offers unique insight into this topic.

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Tara Vanderwoude

Speaking nationwide at conferences, support groups, culture camps, churches, schools, and beyond, social worker Tara VanderWoude educates and challenges parents and professionals on various adoption and race-related topics. She has experienced and studied the many complexities of adoption and has had countless conversations with other adoption-competent professionals but more importantly with fellow adopted persons and their families. Tara, a Korean-born adopted person and adoptive parent, is able to look beyond her own experiences, and teaches with expertise and reality balanced with humor and grace.

For several years, Tara worked as a social worker at a large adoption agency, educating and guiding families throughout the preparation phase to post-adoption period of their adoption processes. It was during these years when she recognized the significant need for lifelong post-adoption education and ongoing support for every member of the adoption community.

Additionally, she sits on the Board of Directors for Korean Focus-Indiana, is a founding member of a local adoption education group, has traveled to South Korea as a volunteer with The Ties Program, and regularly volunteers time with adopted children and their families.

Prior to her professional work in the adoption field, Tara worked as a Medical Social Worker, in-home Family Assessment and Resource Specialist for parents at-risk for child abuse and neglect, and Care Manager Supervisor at a multi-county Area Agency on Aging. Tara holds a Bachelor of Social Work Degree and has attended many professional adoption (and other) conferences and seminars.

Tara lives with her husband and children in an old rehabbed house in a large Midwest city, and she (usually) loves balancing the various roles life brings. She believes vulnerability, humor, and grace are lifelong essentials, and she enjoys laughing with friends, reading with her children, traveling, substitute teaching and volunteering at her kids’ school, and learning, learning, and relearning.

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Understanding and Embracing the Inherent Loss and Grief in Adoption (Part II)
Tara Vanderwoude
While adoption is widely celebrated and brings joy to so many, it is also a response to an initial tragedy and subsequent loss.
Understanding and Embracing the Inherent Loss and Grief in Adoption (Part II)
Tara Vanderwoude

While adoption is widely celebrated and brings joy to so many, it is also a response to an initial tragedy and subsequent loss. Learn how an adopted child is often faced with making sense of this loss. Hear how parents can acknowledge, understand, and give words to the losses – allowing their children to make sense of their full histories, express grief, and feel understood and supported.  As an adopted person and adoptive parent, Tara VanderWoude offers unique insight into this topic.

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Back

Tara Vanderwoude

Speaking nationwide at conferences, support groups, culture camps, churches, schools, and beyond, social worker Tara VanderWoude educates and challenges parents and professionals on various adoption and race-related topics. She has experienced and studied the many complexities of adoption and has had countless conversations with other adoption-competent professionals but more importantly with fellow adopted persons and their families. Tara, a Korean-born adopted person and adoptive parent, is able to look beyond her own experiences, and teaches with expertise and reality balanced with humor and grace.

For several years, Tara worked as a social worker at a large adoption agency, educating and guiding families throughout the preparation phase to post-adoption period of their adoption processes. It was during these years when she recognized the significant need for lifelong post-adoption education and ongoing support for every member of the adoption community.

Additionally, she sits on the Board of Directors for Korean Focus-Indiana, is a founding member of a local adoption education group, has traveled to South Korea as a volunteer with The Ties Program, and regularly volunteers time with adopted children and their families.

Prior to her professional work in the adoption field, Tara worked as a Medical Social Worker, in-home Family Assessment and Resource Specialist for parents at-risk for child abuse and neglect, and Care Manager Supervisor at a multi-county Area Agency on Aging. Tara holds a Bachelor of Social Work Degree and has attended many professional adoption (and other) conferences and seminars.

Tara lives with her husband and children in an old rehabbed house in a large Midwest city, and she (usually) loves balancing the various roles life brings. She believes vulnerability, humor, and grace are lifelong essentials, and she enjoys laughing with friends, reading with her children, traveling, substitute teaching and volunteering at her kids’ school, and learning, learning, and relearning.

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Sensory Experience: Walk a Mile in Their Shoes
Kristin Mathis
Sensory Differences are a significant issue for most of our kids. Many are hypersensitive, many are seekers, a lot are under-responsive and some are all of the above.
Sensory Experience: Walk a Mile in Their Shoes
Kristin Mathis

Sensory Differences are a significant issue for most of our kids. Many are hypersensitive, many are seekers, a lot are under-responsive and some are all of the above. Come join us for a quick overview of Sensory Processing and how it can be seen in you and your children. We’ll talk about it, compare with others and have a “hands on lab” to really help us understand the struggle for many of our kids. You’ll also have the opportunity to experience some practical solutions and leave with new resources to help your children thrive.  

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Kristin Mathis

Occupational Therapist

Kristin Mathis, OTR, and her husband Chris are parents to five amazing kiddos ages 4 -16 (domestic adoption, international toddler adoption, and foster care adoption). Kristin’s background is in child development with a masters degree in occupational therapy. She has worked for ECI and is currently doing home health. Kristin completed professional training in TBRI (Practicioner and Educator) at TCU and her passion for foster and adopted children leads her to find practical ways to encourage health and healing for these wonderful families. She loves brain research, iced tea, and Mexican food.  Her days are full of re-dos (mainly for her), problem-solving and laundry (NOT in that order)

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You Can’t Judge a Child by Their Cover
Angie Proctor
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder often hides beneath behaviors of children who cannot regulate their emotions.
You Can’t Judge a Child by Their Cover
Angie Proctor

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder often hides beneath behaviors of children who cannot regulate their emotions. Many doctors diagnose the effects of prenatal exposure by referring to facial features, premature birth, and low birth weight. However, there is a small window during pregnancy that produces the facial features caused by consuming alcohol during pregnancy. Many children do not have the facial features and therefore, do not receive a FASD diagnosis because health care professionals do not dig deep enough to see the criteria for FASD. This leads to incorrect judgment of poor behavior, results in inadequate treatment, and adds to the shame our loved ones endure about themselves. Let’s open the book cover of our children’s hearts and minds so that we can truly help them heal.

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Angie Proctor

Angie is a wife, a mom to two biological children, and has worked with at-risk children and teens since 2001. She is currently teaching as an adjunct instructor and completing her PhD in Educational Psychology at Texas A&M University in Commerce, TX. Her research on trauma and the educational needs of harmed children will be instrumental in bringing more training and successful interventions to the classroom.

Angie has extensive experience in a residential group home where she served as the Therapeutic Services Director as well as Residential Care Director. The facility served children placed from Child Protective Services, and through private families, including some from failed adoptions. Most of the children served had experienced deep trauma as well as attachment and developmental issues.

Since 2008, Angie has been involved with Dr. Purvis and Dr. Cross at the Institute of Child Development at Texas Christian University. She currently serves as an associate of the Institute as a presenter and trainer for TBRI®. Angie has devoted her life and education to helping children who come from traumatic backgrounds.

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